Joint stock bank

A joint stock bank is one operated by a joint stock or limited company. It is therefore a bank with limited liability. This is in contrast to a private bank which may be owned by a family or individual. All commercial banks in the United Kingdom are joint stock banks.

Similar financial terms

Joint Venture
A business enterprise, usually a corporation, that is formed between two other companies.

Dual-class stock
Two (or more) classes of common stock with equal rights to cash flows but with unequal voting rights

Stock index
A stock index tracks changes in the value of a hypothetical portfolio of stocks. The major stock indices in the world are the NASDAQ Composite, S&P 500 and Dow Jones Index.

Nikkei 225 Stock Average
The Nikkei 225 Stock Average (NIKKEI 225) is based on a portfolio of 225 of the largest stocks trading on the Tokyo Stock Exchange. Stocks are weighted according to their prices.

High-tech stock
Stocks of corporations and companies operating in the high-technology market segments.

Oslo Stock Exchange
In the early 1800s, Norway was a country of farmers and fishermen. Christiania, as the capital city was then called, had just 10,000 citizens. The Norwegian economy was weak, and money was scarce. This had a crushing effect on business and industry, and it was decided that the country needed a commercial exchange to encourage greater commercial activity.

The merchant Nicolay Andresen is generally recognised as the "father" of the Oslo stock exchange. He made the first proposal for a com ...

Capital stock
The value of an outstanding share of stock at the time it was issued

Common stock ratio
A ratio showing the portion of total capitalization represented by common stock and retained earnings. To calculate, add the dollar value of common stock plus retained earnings and divide by total capitalization; the result is expressed as a percentage

Convertible preferred stock
Stock that can be converted to common stock if the investor wishes, at a set price per share or by a specified deadline.

Acquisition of stock
:A merger or consolidation in which an acquirer purchases the acquiree's stock.

Adjustable rate preferred stock (ARPS)
Publicly traded issues that may be collateralized by mortgages and MBSs.

American Stock Exchange (AMEX)
The second-largest stock exchange in the United States. It trades mostly in small-to medium-sized companies.

Treasury stock
Common stock that has been repurchased by the company and held in the company's treasury.

Stockout
Running out of inventory.

Stockholder's equity
The residual claims that stockholders have against a firm's assets, calculated by subtracting total liabilities from total assets.

Stockholder's books
Set of books kept by firm management for its annual report that follows Financial Accounting Standards Board rules. The tax books follow IRS tax rules.

Stockholder
Holder of equity shares in a firm.

Stock ticker
This is a lettered symbol assigned to securities and mutual funds that trade on U.S.financial exchanges.

Stock split
Occurs when a firm issues new shares of stock but in turn lowers the current market price of its stock to a level that is proportionate to pre-split prices. For example, if Cisco trades at $100 before a 2-for-1 split, after the split it will trade at $50 and holders of the stock will have twice as many shares than they had before the split.

Stock replacement strategy
A strategy for enhancing a portfolio's return, employed when the futures contract is expensive based on its theoretical price, involving a swap between the futures, treasury bills portfolio and a stock portfolio.

Stock option
An option in which the underlying is the common stock of a corporation.

Stock market
Also called the equity market, the market for trading equities.

Stock index option
An option in which the underlying is a common stock index.

Stockholder equity
Balance sheet item that includes the book value of ownership in the corporation. It includes capital stock, paid in surplus, and retained earnings.

Stock selection
An active portfolio management technique that focuses on advantageous selection of particular stocks rather than on broad asset-allocation choices.

Stock repurchase
A firm's repurchase of outstanding shares of its common stock.

Stock exchanges
In the US, a stock exchange is a formal organization, approved and regulated by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). The SEC are made up of members that use the facilities to exchange certain common stocks. The two major US stock exchanges are the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) and the American Stock Exchange (ASE or AMEX). Five regional stock exchanges include the Midwest, Pacific, Philadelphia, Boston, and Cincinnati. The Arizona stock exchange is an after hours electronic marketpla ...

Stock dividend
Payment of a corporate dividend in the form of stock rather than cash. The stock dividend may be additional shares in the company, or it may be shares in a subsidiary being spun off to shareholders. Stock dividends are often used to conserve cash needed to operate the business. Unlike a cash dividend, stock dividends are not taxed until sold.

Stock
Ownership of a corporation which is represented by shares which represent a piece of the corporation's assets and earnings.

Reverse stock split
A proportionate decrease in the number of shares, but not the value of shares of stock held by shareholders. Shareholders maintain the same percentage of equity as before the split. For example, a 1-for-3 split would result in stockholders owning 1 share for every 3 shares owned before the split. After the reverse split, the firm's stock price is, in this example, worth three times the pre-reverse split price. A firm generally institutes a reverse split to boost its stock's market price and ...

Repurchase of stock
Device to pay cash to firm's shareholders that provides more preferable tax treatment for shareholders than dividends. Treasury stock is the name given to previously issued stock that has been repurchased by the firm. A repurchase is achieved through either a dutch auction, open market, or tender offer.

Preferred stock agreement
A contract for preferred stock.

Preferred stock
A security that shows ownership in a corporation and gives the holder a claim, prior to the claim of common stockholders, on earnings and also generally on assets in the event of liquidation. Most preferred stock pays a fixed dividend that is paid prior to the common stock dividend, stated in a dollar amount or as a percentage of par value. This stock does not usually carry voting rights. The stock shares characteristics of both common stock and debt.

Preference stock
A security that ranks junior to preferred stock but senior to common stock in the right to receive payments from the firm; essentially junior preferred stock.

Preferred equity redemption stock (PERC)
Preferred stock that converts automatically into equity at a stated date. A limit is placed on the value of the shares the investor receives.

Philadelphia Stock Exchange (PHLX)
A securities exchange where American and European foreign currency options on spot exchange rates are traded.

Non-cumulative preferred stock
Preferred stock whose holders must forgo dividend payments when the company misses a dividend payment.

New York Stock Exchange (NYSE)
Also known as the Big Board or The Exhange. More than 2,000 common and preferred stocks are traded. The exchange is the older in the United States, founded in 1792, and the largest. It is lcoated on Wall Street in New York City

Margin account (Stocks)
A leverageable account in which stocks can be purchased for a combination of cash and a loan. The loan in the margin account is collateralized by the stock and, if the value of the stock drops sufficiently, the owner will be asked to either put in more cash, or sell a portion of the stock. Margin rules are federally regulated, but margin requirements and interest may vary among broker/dealers.

Listed stocks
Stocks that are traded on an exchange.

Letter stock
Privately placed common stock, so-called because the SEC requires a letter from the purchaser stating that the stock is not intended for resale.

Vancouver Stock Exchange (VSE)
The Vancouver Stock exchange (VSE) was one of Canada's junior company stock exchanges. On March 15, 1999, the VSE and the ASE (Alberta Stock Exchange) agreed to merge and form the CDNX - the Canadian Venture Exchange - which will also take on some junior Toronto and Montreal Exchange companies. The VSE got a bad reputation in the 80's due to many unscrupulous scam artists manipulating VSE listed companies. New regulatory controls and surveillance systems which had been implemented on the VSE wer ...

Junior Stock Exchange
A stock exchange which lists mainly small, emerging companies with low market capitalizations (e.g. under $100million or even under $10 million).

Kuala Lumpur Stock Exchange (KLSE)
Incorporated in 1965 as Kuala Lumpur's stock exchange (although share-trading activity dated from the 1930s).

Common stock
These are securities that represent equity ownership in a company. Common shares let an investor vote on such matters as the election of directors. They also give the holder a share in a company's profits via dividend payments or the capital appreciation of the security.

Common stock/other equity
Value of outstanding common shares at par, plus accumulated retained earnings. Also called shareholders' equity.

Common stock equivalent
A convertible security that is traded like an equity issue because the optioned common stock is trading high.

Common stock market
The market for trading equities, not including preferred stock.

Common stock ratios
Ratios that are designed to measure the relative claims of stockholders to earnings (cash flow per share), and equity (book value per share) of a firm.

Conflict between bondholders and stockholders
These two groups may have interests in a corporation that conflict. Sources of conflict include dividends, distortion of investment, and underinvestment. Protective covenants work to resolve these conflicts.

Convertible exchangeable preferred stock
Convertible preferred stock that may be exchanged, at the issuer's option, into convertible bonds that have the same conversion features as the convertible preferred stock.

Cumulative preferred stock
Preferred stock whose dividends accrue, should the issuer not make timely dividend payments.

Blank Check Preferred Stock
This is stock over which the board of directors has broad authority to determine voting, dividend, conversion, and other rights. While it can be used to enable a company to meet changing financial needs, its most important use is to implement poison pills or to prevent takeovers by placement of this stock with friendly investors.

Bo Derek stock
High quality stock.

Madrid Stock Exchange (Bolsa de Madrid)
The largest of Spain's four stock exchange.

Preferred Stock
An (equity) security which has a priority relative to ordinary common shares for dividends and return of par amount in the event of a corporate dissolution. Often, preferred shares are nonvoting equity interests. However, a default in the payment of that issue's preferred dividend or other covenant breach may temporarily give the preferred holders voting powers. Preferred shares can have convertible, cumulative, participating, voting, or other special features.

Montreal Stock Exchange (MSE)
One of the four major stock exchanges in Canada.

Commercial Grain Stocks
Domestic grain in store in public and private elevators at important markets and grain afloat in vessels or barges in lake and seaboard ports.

Certificated or Certified Stocks
Stocks of a commodity that have been inspected and found to be of a quality deliverable against futures contracts, stored at the delivery points designated as regular or acceptable for delivery by a commodity exchange. In grain, called "stocks in deliverable position".

Bankrupt
This occurs when someone is unable to pay their debts and creditors move to secure what monies they can from any existing assets (property) held by that person. All property is then administered by the official receiver. A bankrupt - if still able to work - will only receive an allowance to live on after payments are made to creditors

European Central Bank (ECB)
The Central Bank for the new European Monetary Union.

Agency bank
A form of organization commonly used by foreign banks to enter the U.S. market. An agency bank cannot accept deposits or extend loans in its own name; it acts as agent for the parent bank.

World Bank
A multilateral development finance agency created by the 1944 Bretton Woods, New Hampshire negotiations. It makes loans to developing countries for social overhead capital projects, which are guaranteed by the recipient country.

Wholesale mortgage banking
The purchasing of loans originated by others, with the servicing rights released to the purchaser.

Prepackaged bankruptcy
A bankruptcy in which a debtor and its creditors pre-negotiate a plan or reorganization and then file it along with the bankruptcy petition.

PIBOR (Paris Interbank Offer Rate)
The deposit rate on interbank transactions in the Eurocurrency market quoted in Paris.

Money center banks
Banks that raise most of their funds from the domestic and international money markets , relying less on depositors for funds.

Merchant bank
A British term for a bank that specializes not in lending out its own funds, but in providing various financial services such as accepting bills arising out of trade, underwriting new issues, and providing advice on acquisitions, mergers, foreign exchange, portfolio management, etc.

Legal bankruptcy
A legal proceeding for liquidating or reorganizing a business.

Bank anticipation notes (BAN)
Notes issued by states and municipalities to obtain interim financing for projects that will eventually be funded long term through the sale of a bond issue.

Bank discount basis
A convention used for quoting bids and offers for treasury bills in terms of annualized yield , based on a 360-day year.

Bank draft
A draft addressed to a bank.

Bank line
Line of credit granted by a bank to a customer.

Bank wire
A computer message system linking major banks. It is used not for effecting payments, but as a mechanism to advise the receiving bank of some action that has occurred, e.g. the payment by a customer of funds into that bank's account.

Banker's acceptance
A short-term credit investment created by a non-financial firm and guaranteed by a bank as to payment. Acceptances are traded at discounts from face value in the secondary market. These instruments have been a popular investment for money market funds. They are commonly used in international transactions.

Bank for International Settlements (BIS)
An international bank headquartered in Basel, Switzerland, which serves as a forum for monetary cooperation among several European central banks, the Bank of Japan, and the U.S. Federal Reserve System. Founded in 1930 to handle the German payment of World War I reparations, it now monitors and collects data on international banking activity and promulgates rules concerning international bank regulation.

Bankruptcy
State of being unable to pay debts. Thus, the ownership of the firm's assets is transferred from the stockholders to the bondholders.

Bankruptcy cost view
The argument that expected indirect and direct bankruptcy costs offset the other benefits from leverage so that the optimal amount of leverage is less than 100% debt finaning.

Bankruptcy risk
The risk that a firm will be unable to meet its debt obligations. Also referred to as default or insolvency risk.

Bankruptcy view
The argument that expected bankruptcy costs preclude firms from being financed entirely with debt.

Clearing House Interbank Payments System (CHIPS)
An international wire transfer system for high-value payments operated by a group of major banks.

Consortium banks
A merchant banking subsidiary set up by several banks that may or may not be of the same nationality. Consortium banks are common in the Euromarket and are active in loan syndication.

Basel Committee on Banking Supervision
A committee that meets under the auspices of the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland to set bank regulatory standards.

Federal Home Loan Bank Act of 1932
Law that created the Federal Home Loan Bank Board and a network of regional home loan banks.

Federal Home Loan Bank Board (FHLBB)
The FHLBB is an agency responsible for regulating and controlling savings and loan institutions, superseded by FIRREA in 1989.

International Financial and Banking Centre (IFC)
A country identified as being a tax haven.

Termbox
Digg the financial term Digg it!
Share financial term on facebook! Share on Facebook
Add to Yahoo My Web Add to Yahoo!
Add to Google bookmarks! Add to Google
Add financial term to del.icio.us Add to del.icio.us
Add financial term to Reddit! Add to Reddit
Add financial term on Spurl Add to Spurl
Add financial term to Furl Add to Furl
E-mail term to a friend! E-mail term to friend!
Printer friendly version Printer friendly version


Did you know?

Redemption charge

The commission charged by a mutual fund when redeeming shares. For example, a 2% redemption charge (also called a "back end load") on the sale of shares valued at 1000 will result in payment of 980 (or 98% of the value) to the investor. This charge may decrease or be eliminated as shares are held for longer time periods.


Popular terms


About us  About bizterms.net
Contact us  Contact us
Bookmark us